The black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) is a freshwater fish found in North America, one of the two crappies. It is very similar to the white crappie in size, shape, and habits, except that it is darker, with a pattern of black spots. Black crappies are most accurately identified by the seven or eight spines on its dorsal fin (white crappies have five or six dorsal spines).[1] Crappies have a deep and laterally compressed body. They are usually silvery-gray to green in color and show irregular or mottled black splotches over the entire body.[1][2] Black crappies have rows of dark spots on their dorsal, anal, and caudal fins.[1] The dorsal and anal fins resemble each other in shape.[1] Both crappies have large mouths extending to below the eye, and thin lips—both suggestive of their piscivorous feeding habits.[1][3] Crappies are typically 4–8 inches (10–20 cm) long. The current all-tackle fishing world record for a black crappie is 2.25 kg (5 lbs. 0 oz.).[4] The maximum length reported for a black crappie is 19.3 inches (49 cm) and the maximum published weight is just under 6 pounds (2,700 g).